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TIPS FOR SHOPPING FOR DANCE LESSONS
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Are you shopping for dance lessons? Two minutes to read this will help.

Would you buy a pair of shoes without first looking at them closely and then trying them on? Would you buy a car without looking it over and test-driving it first? Of course not. You're going to do a little research first and then make a decision.

Don't just compare prices for dance lessons without checking into who is going to be teaching you. Imagine dancing in front of other people with lessons from an amateur or even someone calling themselves a "professional", but has no reliable credentials?

Whether you decide to take dance lessons with Fred Astaire Quad Cities or somewhere else, if you follow these simple tips, you will save yourself A LOT of time, money and heachaches and find exactly what you are looking for. Beware of just shopping price and beware of who you are considering paying money to for dance lessons. Just because they may have a website or a physical location does not mean they are worth paying money to for dance lessons.


The simple requirements:


  • Do they teach full time?
  • Do they have a Dance Director?
  • Are they certified by a nationally recognized ballroom dance organization?
  • Do they have an approved syllabus?
  • Do they have an approved method of teaching?


The first things to find out when you are calling or web searching for information on ballroom dance lessons is:


  • Do they teach full time?

Many places teach dance only part-time and they have other jobs, which means they are not able to accommodate students' schedules as easily as a full-time dance studio/school. Also, if they have other jobs, when do they have time to further their own dance training and/or train their staff?


  • Do they have a Dance Director?

Who is the Dance Director and what are their credentials? The Dance Director is "Where the rubber meets the road" in that dance studio. This person should have at the very least, one certification. They should have been trained by top national (or international) instructors, coaches and judges. This is the person that trains and oversees the training of all the teachers at that studio that will be teaching you.


  • Are they certified by a nationally recognized ballroom dance organization?

Did you know that there are only 5 nationally recognized ballroom dance certification programs in this country? Three of which are The National Dance Council of America (NDCA), The North American Dance Teachers Association (NADTA) and The Fred Astaire National Council of Dance (FANCD). Certifications from these organizations provide standardization and quality for the consumer (buyer) of dance lessons.


  • Do they have an approved syllabus?

A syllabus is a curriculum. Just as when you went to school to learn reading, writing and mathematics, so too with a dance school. If the school doesn't have an approved curriculum, what are you going to be learning and where did it come from?


  • Do they have an approved method of teaching?

Just as when you went to school to learn reading, writing and mathematics, so too with a dance school. An approved method of teaching is a method that has been tested and certified by a governing board to insure that students are being taught in the most effective and efficient manner possible. If the school doesn't have an approved method of teaching, how are you going to be taught and who created it?


After you collect this information, now it's time to compare:


  • Are you comparing the same kind of apples (the dance studio/schools have all of the above)?
  • Or, are you comparing different types of apples (those that have all the above with those that only have some or none of the above)? Just like there are a dozen different kinds of apples, be sure you are comparing the same kind of Ballroom dance lessons.
  • Be sure to compare Dance Directors, certifications, syllabi and teaching methods.
  • If you find studios/schools that contain all of the above AND are identical in quality (especially the Dance Directors), now you can be sure you have a fair comparison based upon all of the facts above and now you are ready to compare price.
  • If you compare dance lessons prior to this fair comparison you are risking your time and money. All you are doing is shopping price and nowhere is the old adage "You get what you pay for" more true than with dance lessons. ANYONE can say they are a dance instructor, but that does not mean they are worth any amount of money.


Finally, consider this.


What if you paid money to and took ballroom dance lessons from a place that can't give you all of the above?